Author: Cleo Tarca

A Mexican Chef Cooks Mexican Food…Finally.

Why aren’t more Latinos spearheading their own food movement? It’s a question that Los Angeles Mexican chef Henry Orellana is trying to answer. The topic is certainly emotionally charged: he tells me he is “completely irked” that Mexican cuisine is continually portrayed as simply a “taco and burrito stand culture,” although he acknowledges that in some ways “we’ve [Mexicans] allowed it to happen.’ Orellana is fighting against the notion that Mexican food is just eating burritos at 2.am after a night of drinking: “It can and should be part of the gastronomic landscape,” he asserts. For Orellana, restaurants claiming to deliver upscale Mexican food feel as though something is missing. “Most times, the person conceptualizing [these restaurants] is white,” he tells me. “90% of the people actually cooking the food are Mexican, but they don’t feel like it’s their food and they wouldn’t eat there themselves.” He adds, “It’s not a race thing, it’s a culture thing. People forget that cooking is more to do with being immersed in a culture or tradition than anything …

Venue Managers Needed!

We’re seeking FOH superstars to manage our multiple pop-up dining venues! We host events seven days a week, from nightly dinners and weekend brunches to corporate events, private parties, and happy hours. Duties Include: Managing venue schedules Organizing guest lists at events Opening and closing venues for chefs Supporting chef efforts in setup, service, operations, breakdown and clean up Acting as brand ambassador during events by engaging guests and creating advocates Must Be: Dynamic, engaging, and extroverted Positive, articulate and personable Organized and efficient Flexible and willing to pitch in for anything! Available on nights and weekends Restaurant FOH experienced preferred. To Apply: Please submit your employment application form below.   Loading…

Food Photography Tips From The Pros

It’s the digital age, so everyone takes pictures of their food…because if you didn’t post it, it didn’t happen, right? We sat down with two professional food photographers to find out how amateur shutterbugs can expertly document runny egg yolks or a perfectly swirled dollop of whipped cream. Meet our pros:     Natural light is ideal for shooting food. Katie: When it comes to photographing food, light is everything. It doesn’t matter if you use your iPhone or a high-end DSLR. Focus on having one key light, and try to block other conflicting light sources like overhead artificial lighting. Placing the dish next to a window is a wonderful way to get a nice soft natural light from the side. If the sunlight is too harsh next to a window, move a bit more into the shadow, but stop before the shadow gets too dark or your light will become flat. Kimberly: Turn off those overhead lights. Most indoor lighting casts a yellowish or orange tint to your images, which makes the food look less …

Your 2017 Challenge: Go To A PopUp “Alone”

Image Credit: Jonny Hunter Why You Can And Should Dine Solo At PopUps 2017 is in full swing and we’re raring up for a year of new experiences. Join us! We challenge you to head to a popup event sans friend or date. It’s a great way to meet new people, try delicious cuisine, and break out of your comfort zone. Not convinced? Check out our strategies for rocking the solo dining experience. Because going to a popup alone is actually the opposite of eating alone. They are generally communal, and it turns out sitting next to strangers is awesome! Like the first week in your college dorm, embrace the camaraderie!  The chef is front and center. A popup chef is very present, telling the story of each dish. Diners are also encouraged to interact with the chef, which is an experience one is not usually afforded in a typical restaurant. You pay for one, but you dine with many. One ticket to a popup gets you an unexpected culinary experience, but it’s also a social engagement. …

Coi’s Chef De Cuisine and the Art of Fine Dining

At Oakland’s Boot and Shoe, amidst aromas of brick-oven baking and freshly ground coffee, I ask Chef De Cuisine Justin Mauz of two Michelin-starred Coi if fine dining is still relevant. Unequivocally he states, “There will always be fine dining in society, but its place has shifted…I see myself staying in this. Very simply, it allows me to create an unparalleled guest experience which is not present in more casual dining these days.” It’s an intriguing answer, especially given the ongoing trend of fine dining chefs opening less formal, less expensive restaurants. “Fine dining” evokes images of the white tablecloth and the triple-digit tasting menu, but it goes far beyond an ornate and expensive meal. According to Mauz, what distinguishes fine dining is the deep commitment to deliver guests “a seamless experience of comfort and luxury” from the moment they enter. “One of the many benefits of cooking for fewer people on a nightly basis with elevated expectations is that we have the opportunity to deliver this…If some element of the food or dining experience …

These Holiday Traditions Prove That Food is Always Worth Celebrating

We know that getting into the holiday spirit often involve spirits (and food) so we polled our talented chefs and the Feastly HQ team for their favorite culinary customs. Maybe you’ll adopt one from below. Making Dumplings & Spring Rolls Feastly Chef Kryssie Kryssie is equal parts Phillippines and So-Cal. She feeds LA home-cooked Filipino eats with a fresh approach and good vibes. “My favorite holiday tradition is making pork dumplings and egg rolls with my mom around the dinner table for Christmas ‘noche buena.’ “   4-Course Creole Feast Feastly Chef Sophina  “If Anthony Bourdain and Sarah Silverman had a lovechild, it would be me.” She serves up adventurous and eclectic eats on the regular in prep for the launch of her Oakland restaurant. Her favorite tradition is New Orleans Reveillon. “Basically a post Christmas Eve mass dinner in the Creole tradition filled with mostly luxurious eats like crab gumbo, oysters, shrimp remoulade, calas, sweets, Hubig’s pies and Cochon de Lait. A long, leisurely meal with family and friends.”   A Small, Fruity Stocking Stuffer Feastly …

Feastly Holiday Gift Guide

‘Tis the season for frantic shopping! Have no fear…we’ve got a unique food-centric gift roundup for even the pickiest eaters or cooks on your list. The best part? Many products are sourced from our cities or from our talented Feastly chefs. Last-Minute Gifts Here’s looking at you, holiday procrastinators! We’re right there with you.  More Food-Lover Favorites For when you’ve planned ahead.

The Michelin-Grade Chefs Behind The City’s Best Restaurants

Our chefs make Feastly what it is–a diverse collection of experiences to tantalize every palate and suit every fancy. We’re so proud of our lineup that we’re highlighting some new additions and seasoned veterans. These chefs are taking it to the next level, bringing their years of experience from high-profile culinary establishments. This Michelin-grade and award-winning crew is elevating the average popup meal, creating delicious dining experiences from the traditional to the avant-garde. * denotes Michelin stars acquired by the restaurant as of 2016.