All posts filed under: Reading List

What We’re Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

kushikatsu by kimishowota  This weekend, avoid your spring cleaning with our list of weird news and wonderful stories from the culinary world. Then, head over to our latest roundup of favorite Instagram photos posted by you, our diners. + In a made-for-TV story: a dying father’s long lost recipe for fried meat-on-a-stick turned his daughter into a multimillionaire. + A student project that proposes repurposing washing machines as sous-vide tubs went viral this week. It’s a direct homage to the classic alt-appliance recipe for  steam-your-fish-in-the-dishwasher. + If you like the idea of buttery coffee but don’t believe the bulletproof hype, try coffee-enhanced butter. With only 15 minutes, this recipe from Tasting Table will upgrade your toast game with a delicious jolt of caffeine without the health gimmicks.  + While you’re getting all buttered up, check out the latest news about the decline of margarine sales. With new science vilifying unhealthy saturated fats commonly found in margarine, is it that surprising that margarine will likely never be better than butter? + No one will love you more than …

What We’re Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

Fake Pink Sugar by Alan Levine If you’re like us, you probably spend a lot of time nerding out on dining news and food industry gossip during the week, but spend your weekends consuming longer and more compelling food narratives. Or maybe you just read the headlines while scrolling through social media because Mondays (all the way through Fridays) just slay. Either way, we’ve got the perfect weekend gift for you: a diverse list of intriguing food stories and news to keep you satiated. Enjoy! + Sweeten up your reads with this bizarre history of artificial sweeteners. You’ll learn that nearly every artificial sweetener was discovered by a scientist licking his finger when he technically shouldn’t have. + If your morning drug of choice is caffeine, then you might be interested in this strange, new product: clear coffee. + The cost of dining is rising but at $5,500, this meal is extraordinarily expensive. Joshua David Stein of Tasting Tables writes about the experience and value proposition of luxury dining.  Each of the eight courses grew more and …

Weekend Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

This weekend, we’re bringing you great stories about the most important food groups: avocado, burgers, and tacos. + Despite being less salty, Maldon salt, aka fancy salt, has a cult following unlike any other sodium variances. In fact, Maldon salt is also less bitter, and according to some chefs, even slightly sweet tasting. Read about its history and unique processing methods:  The saltmakers boil the brine, then reduce the temperature until inverted-pyramid crystals form on the surface, like the skein of ice on a martini. At some point, the crystals, under their own weight, fall to the bottom of the pan like snow. + This Avocado bar is probably the world’s first avocado-themed restaurant and it’s not even in California. And yes, they do serve avocado toast.  + Put aside your pizza and bagel guides and get familiar with New York City’s hamburger styles. With variations like the Goober Burger (peanut butter and jelly) and the California Burger (actually has no avocado), this is one American classic that thrives on reinvention.  + Puerh commands the highest price tag of …

Weekend Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

Photo courtesy of Breville USA Get ready for the weird and the wonderful. We’re bringing you an illustrated egg guide, a courtroom butter battle, and a laser-cut ham and cheese bust of Vin Diesel. Needless to say, the forecast for your weekend reading is 100% interesting. + Dive into the complex story of San Francisco’s culinary icon, Daniel Patterson, and his recent fast food project Locol. “I went to a doctor,” he said, “and I was like, ‘Yeah, so I’m depressive and I need something,’ and he said, ‘Do you want to kill yourself?’ ‘No, that would take way too much energy.’ He said, ‘You can take Prozac, but it might kill your libido, or Wellbutrin, but it might make you speedy.’ Is that really a choice?” As medication put Patterson’s demons “behind glass,” as he put it, he began to suspect that pursuit of a third Michelin star might not be the path to happiness. + What do you get when you combine ham, cheese, and lasers? A ham and cheese bust of Vin Diesel …

Weekend Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

Rain or shine, the forecast for reading looks positively edifying. This weekend’s list gives us a closer look how science can improve wine bottles, explain why smoothies make you feel fuller, and why acupuncture for cows might not be such a silly idea. + Are you going to restaurants less than before? If you answered yes, you are not alone. According to a recent survey from Reuters/Ipsos, 30 percent U.S. adults “said they were eating out less often than three months ago. Of those diners, 62 percent said cost was the primary reason.” + Laughable, but actually legitimate: Swiss cows are now getting acupuncture. Historically common in Korea and China, the alternative veterinary practice is now bringing positive results for various treatments from inflammation to reduced sperm count. + Uncorking a bottle of wine is a real pleasure but pouring from a wine bottle is a real unpleasant experience thanks to the now 200-year old design. That might soon be a problem of the past thanks to Daniel Perlman, wine-lover, inventor and Brandeis University biophysicist. The solution? Adding an additional groove …

Weekend Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

We hope you’re ready to get lit on the literary. This week’s list is an ode to Lucky Peach, Irene Kuo’s The Key to the Chinese Cooking, Patel Bros, and much more stellar writing from the culinary web. + Travelers and expatriates who have purchased/cooked eggs in foreign countries may already know the answer to this question: why do Americans refrigerate their eggs? Worth a read – this short piece offers a small sampling of the industrial system’s web of influences on American food practices. + This week, we are sad to say goodbye to Lucky Peach. Their days are numbered but there’s no better way to eulogize the irreverent food magazine: by reading these 13 stellar examples of their unique style of lowbrow/highbrow food writing. + Food just tastes better when you’re drunk. Here’s the science to back it up. + Food 52’s historical essay on How America lost the ‘Key to the Chinese Cooking’ is worth a look because it is one of the few biographical narratives of Irene Kuo you’ll find online. Of course we’d also recommend …

What We’re Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

Photo: Catharine Abegg This weekend reading list is a giant serving of inspiration thanks to the amazing talents of women in food everywhere. From 1930’s France to Kabul, Afghanistan – let’s travel the globe for a female perspective. + A story worth toasting: Oakland’s next craft spirit business owner is an East Oakland native and an African American female.  Jessica Moncada is no stranger to breaking barriers: She was one of the first female bartenders to be hired at the Uptown Oakland bar Flora, and over the years she’s gotten her fair share of funny looks when telling strangers that she works in the craft spirits industry — because she doesn’t have “the mustache, or the height, or the look.” + Here’s a name you should know but probably don’t: Eugénie Brazier. She was a trailblazing French chef who held six simultaneous Michelin Stars – a 65-year record that was only bested in 1998 by Alain Ducasse. Brazier was also likely the first chef to receive the first triple star Michelin ranking but history seems to …

Weekend Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

Pull up an armchair and treat yourself to our another round of great food reads. From illustrated food to artsy museum dinners, we think won’t find a tastier list. + Lucky Peach’s list of 30 Iconic Dishes of Fine Dining (complete with black and white illustrations) got us salivating. + The best restaurants are coming to a museum near you, and like the work you might find on the gallery walls, the food is also art. Like that at the National Museum of African American History & Culture in Washington, D.C., Sweet Home Café serves up both art and history on a plate: With the help of noted culinary historian Jessica Harris, Grant and his team have divided African American migration and culinary traditions into four regions. The Agricultural South station serves buttermilk fried chicken and black pepper cornmeal waffles, while the nearby Northern States section offers oyster pan roast, a rendition of a dish made by Thomas Downing, the son of freed slaves who became a restaurateur in New York in the early 1800s.   …

What We’re Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

Gift yourself a serving of good food reads this weekend. From camel milk to aerosol cuisine to Dominique Crenn, we’re sure these will satiate all of your cravings. + Acquire a taste for this: camel milk. This mass market commodity is hitting the grocery aisles in India. NPR has the story behind elixir and its potential health benefits: Elisha Harissa, 45, who has diabetes and lives in a nearby village regularly drinks camel milk. He claims it regulates his blood sugar. A few studies suggest there may be some scientific merit to these claims – camel milk seems to help regulate insulin secretion and blood sugar levels in patients with Type1 diabetes – suggesting it could potentially be used alongside other medical treatments to manage diabetes. However, scientists are still investigating the therapeutic potential of camel milk.  + 2Chainz is known for his fresh rhymes, but according to the Georgia Department of Public Health, his food is not so fresh. The musician’s tapas-style seafood restaurant, Escobar, received an appalling score of 59 out of 100 possible …

Weekend Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

We’ve got the perfect rainy day companion below: a surprising update on Whole Food’s new struggles with organic’s popularity, Shower Beer, West Virginia’s successful school lunches post-Jamie Oliver, and more! + Whole Foods is struggling for the first time in decades and the culprit is exactly who you’re thinking —millennials! According to the Washington Post, millennials’ insatiable appetite for organic food has made organic food product sales more competitive than ever: Walmart ramped up its organics selection in 2006. Kroger introduced its Simple Truth brand in 2012 — the store’s chief executive, Mike Ellis, later said it was the store’s “most successful brand launch ever.” Earlier this week, Aldi announced plans for a $1.6 billion U.S. expansion, with much of that growth aimed at offering “a wider range of organic and gluten-free products.” + Drinking in the shower is not a common past time, but that’s about to change with “Shower Beer” from the Swedish craft brewery PangPang. Why not? It’s the weekend. + Here’s an end to a fishy story: Northern California restaurant Odeum was caught serving …