Author: Phi Tran

Weekend Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

Get ready to get lit on the literary. We’ve got the best culinary news and stories for your weekend consumption. + TIL: avocado toasts were an Aussie invention from the 1930’s. Who knew this popular millennial dish was so historic? But even in 1931, avocado toast wasn’t new. In 1920, in the Covina Argus, a newspaper from a town in the San Gabriel Valley, a writer named Martin Fesler gave his recipe for Avocado on Toast: “Remove the skin and mash with a fork. Spread thickly on a small square of hot toast. Add a little salt and pepper.” He called it one of the nicest ways of serving avocado. + People will milk anything these days – even bananas! + Restaurants are keeping their doors open all day  from morning to night because food-ing for a living is hard. It’s even harder if you want to be profitable. As formal fine dining takes a backseat to more casual fare, the all-day destination makes sense. Continuous dining lets restaurateurs tap into the same mores that are …

Instagram Favorites of the Week

Our community of diners are avid food lovers with a great eye for beautiful imagery and so this weekly column celebrates great Instagram photos from Feastly events taken by you, our biggest fans. We’ll be picking one photograph from the list each month for a giveaway of a free seat to a Feastly event. Just tag your photos with #feastly for consideration.

What We’re Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

We’re scoured the best of the web for food lovers. From $25 per pound cherries to free roadkill, we’ve got food stories for every budget. + Good fruit will cost you a pretty penny. Good, fresh fruit will cost you one thousand pretty pennies. Head over to The Orchard in Brooklyn and you’ll get a sense for this specialty price tag at Brooklyn’s upscale fruit store. Produce is a challenging, low-margin business, even if you’re hawking cheap, last-off-the-truck, woody asparagus to clientele who don’t care much about quality. Selling perfect specimens of fruit, be they $25-per-pound cherries from Australia or $20-per-pound soursop from the Caribbean, requires the alignment of myriad unmanageable factors—weather, water levels, and airport schedules being just a handful. The product must be moved efficiently, and customers must be willing to pay a pretty penny (or one thousand of them) for it. + Looking for the best street food in LA? Head to this Guatemalan street market. + Interesting news: roadkill dinners are now (finally) legal in Oregon. + Smuggling food is just as …

Instagram Favorites of the Week

Our community of diners are avid food lovers with a great eye for beautiful imagery and so this weekly column celebrates great Instagram photos from Feastly events taken by you, our biggest fans. We’ll be picking one photograph from the list each month for a giveaway of a free seat to a Feastly event. Just tag your photos with #feastly for consideration. Want to attend an event to take your own snaps? We’ve added links to the chefs’ events below each image. Congratulations to Erica Lyo  for this fun capture of small bites from our summer Taste of Feastly event in SOMA. The next official Feastly event will take place in Golden Gate Park. Get your spot here. Some goodies from tonight’s pop up with @nancypholicioussss 😋#tasteofsummer #popup #feastly #feastlysf #sfeats A post shared by E Lyo (@eleeeyo) on Jun 14, 2017 at 10:28pm PDT Oysters and Champagne on Ice event that I found on Feastly! The thought of going to dinner alone and eating with strangers was daunting at first, but I’m pleased to say that …

Weekend Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

Your long weekend deserves food reading boosts. We’re here to help you with just that. + What if you could drink your way to sustainability? Now you can with this new beer crafted from food waste. “[Bread] is one of the most wasted foods in the developed world, for sure,” Lizarondo tells SAVEUR. “Some of the bread, especially the packaged ones, have a longer shelf life but artisan breads frequently do not. We thought that turning it into beer would be a great way to not only save it from going to landfills but to start a conversation about food waste.” + To peel or not to peel – who knew kiwi consumption could be so controversial? + It took the Trump presidency, but it is now no longer a criminal offense to sell food on the streets of LA. Fearing a coming crackdown on immigrants under President Trump, Los Angeles City Council members Joe Buscaino and Curren Price vowed to stop punishing vending as a crime and to begin setting up a regulated system. + …

What We’re Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

This week’d food news trend: dangerous and unhealthy things to avoid (coconut oil, airplane coffee/tea, whipped cream dispensers).  + The hottest trend in cooking is also one of the oldest. Read about how restaurants are serving up s’more smoky flavors. + There’s probably no better state than California to enjoy avocado and no better city than Los Angeles to have it on toasts. Here’s a photographic guide from the NYT to help you wade through LA’s best avocado toasts. + Looking to consume a lot of saturated fats? You might be already in the form of “healthy-ish” coconut oil. An AHA survey found that 72 percent of Americans considered coconut oil a health food. But coconut oil, it turns out, is shockingly high in saturated fats. And saturated fat ― even though some elements of its effects are up for debate ― isn’t good for you no matter how you slice it. + San Marzano tomatoes command a higher price tag, so it’s no wonder they’re considered “The Fake Rolex of Canned Foods.” Read more …

Weekend Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

+ Only after one year in operation,  Locol’s original Uptown Oakland location has shuttered. Initial reports indicate that chefs Daniel Patterson and Roy Choi are planning moving the current burgers and fast food menu to their other Locol bakery and pizza location in West Oakland. + Fast on the tail of cat cafes: rat cafes. You heard that right – at the SF Dungeon, the tourist attraction is offering a popup cafe where customers can get museum admission along with tea, coffee, and pastry – and rats! They’re not letting any old rodent wander in off the street, either. According to a press release, Rattie Ratz, a Californian organisation “dedicated to the rescue, rehabilitation, and placement of domestic pet rats” is providing the animals. + 16.4 million. That’s the number of grown US adults who thinks chocolate milk comes from brown cows. Agriculture illiteracy is real: When one team of researchers interviewed fourth-, fifth- and sixth-graders at an urban California high school, they found that more than half of them didn’t know pickles were cucumbers, …