Author: Phi Tran

What We’re Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

Gift yourself a serving of good food reads this weekend. From camel milk to aerosol cuisine to Dominique Crenn, we’re sure these will satiate all of your cravings. + Acquire a taste for this: camel milk. This mass market commodity is hitting the grocery aisles in India. NPR has the story behind elixir and its potential health benefits: Elisha Harissa, 45, who has diabetes and lives in a nearby village regularly drinks camel milk. He claims it regulates his blood sugar. A few studies suggest there may be some scientific merit to these claims – camel milk seems to help regulate insulin secretion and blood sugar levels in patients with Type1 diabetes – suggesting it could potentially be used alongside other medical treatments to manage diabetes. However, scientists are still investigating the therapeutic potential of camel milk.  + 2Chainz is known for his fresh rhymes, but according to the Georgia Department of Public Health, his food is not so fresh. The musician’s tapas-style seafood restaurant, Escobar, received an appalling score of 59 out of 100 possible …

Weekend Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

We’ve got the perfect rainy day companion below: a surprising update on Whole Food’s new struggles with organic’s popularity, Shower Beer, West Virginia’s successful school lunches post-Jamie Oliver, and more! + Whole Foods is struggling for the first time in decades and the culprit is exactly who you’re thinking —millennials! According to the Washington Post, millennials’ insatiable appetite for organic food has made organic food product sales more competitive than ever: Walmart ramped up its organics selection in 2006. Kroger introduced its Simple Truth brand in 2012 — the store’s chief executive, Mike Ellis, later said it was the store’s “most successful brand launch ever.” Earlier this week, Aldi announced plans for a $1.6 billion U.S. expansion, with much of that growth aimed at offering “a wider range of organic and gluten-free products.” + Drinking in the shower is not a common past time, but that’s about to change with “Shower Beer” from the Swedish craft brewery PangPang. Why not? It’s the weekend. + Here’s an end to a fishy story: Northern California restaurant Odeum was caught serving …

Weekend Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

What’s threatening food producers this week? Our short list includes immigration policies and global warming. But it’s not all doom and gloom. To keep your reading light, we’re also spicing things up with hot sauces and Harambe in Flamin’ Hot Cheeto form. Read on! + California’s Central Valley farmers who supported Trump are now concerned about losing cheap, immigrant labor. According to researchers at UC Davis, nearly 70% of all farm workers are undocumented, and given the Valley’s agriculture-dominated economy, any threat to low-wage labor would severely impact the region’s 6.5 million people: “If you only have legal labor, certain parts of this industry and this region will not exist,” said Harold McClarty, a fourth-generation farmer in Kingsburg whose operation grows, packs and ships peaches, plums and grapes throughout the country. “If we sent all these people back, it would be a total disaster.” + We’re making a beeline for the hottest new restaurant on the West Coast: SingleThread. Head over to Tasting Table to read about the up-and-coming restaurant and its epic, table-specific 9-course …

What We’re Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

We’ve got the perfect weekend gift for you: a diverse list of intriguing food stories and news to keep you satiated. Enjoy a 9,000-year history of booze and then get curried up with a story about the decline of Britain’s iconic Indian restaurants. + Grab your booze of choice and read 9,000 years of alcohol history. This story from National Geographic paints a vibrant history even monkeys can appreciate: Robert Dudley, the University of California, Berkeley physiologist… calls it the “drunken monkey” hypothesis. The primates that ventured down out of the trees got access to a brand-new food source. “If you can smell the alcohol and get to the fruit faster, you have an advantage,” Dudley says. “You defeat the competition and get more calories.” The ones that stuffed themselves were the most likely to succeed at reproduction—and to experience (while eating) a gentle rush of pleasure in the brain. + Chipotle’s profits fell by 95% in one year, from $476 million in 2015 to just $23 million in 2016. This could spell the beginning of the end of …

Weekend Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

Photo by Jeff Kubina We’re serving up another round of diverse food reads this weekend. From tips for making better pizza at home to cannabis pop-ups – there’s something in here to nourish all your reading bones. + If you’ve ever attempted pizza-making at home, you’ll appreciate this great list of advice from Lucky Peach on mastering the savory pie. Our favorite: don’t skimp on time. Instead, age your dough in the fridge for more complex flavor and texture! + The popularity of the Instant Pot caught us by surprise, and apparently its rise to fame was due to good, old-fashioned word of mouth – but on social media. Read more on NPR’s coverage of the multi-function pressure cooker and its manufacturer’s savvy marketing tactics: While the company does not sponsor paid content or promotions, it has provided free Instant Pots to 200 bloggers and cookbook authors who represent many styles of cooking, including Chinese, Italian, sous-vide and vegan. + Post-inauguration, things are getting a lot more political in the kitchen. As more and more restaurants …

Weekend Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

Get your weekend going in the read direction with this week’s best-of food writing from around the web. From the eccentric chicken taco shell to the frightening Dungeness crab news, we hope you’ll turn your eyes to these stories that got us reading. + Proof that the best is not always the biggest, this LA restaurant is another gem putting Filipino food on the map. At 275 square feet, DTLA’s Ricebar is no small inspiration. Read about the chef’s transition from cooking at Michelin-starred Coi, attending med school, to hosting popups before founding his own tiny kitchen specializing in heirloom rice: “People would probably kill me for buying rice this expensive and selling it at this price point, but I was like, ‘We’ve gotta do it. I’ll make up the difference on my end,’” he said. “That’s what chefs do. If you want it, you make it work—somehow.” + Dungeness crab, the culinary saga, takes another quick turn for the unfortunate. According to The Seattle Times, the crustacean is one of the latest victims to oceanic …

What We’re Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

This week, we’re filling our reading basket with Anthony Bourdain on politics, Michelin Star aversions, and pizza ATMs. We hope you will enjoy these great stories as much as we did! + If you’ve ever baked in high elevations you’ll definitely understand the struggle of no-elevation baking.  What’s it like cooking in zero gravity? Check out this two part journal from NASA astronaut Sandra Magnus about cooking and eating in space.  I should first mention the overall utility of the tortilla as a basic food group here in space. You can do so much with a tortilla; it becomes the vehicle with which to eat almost anything. I cannot think of anything that cannot be put on a tortilla, or has not been put on a tortilla. + We like it hot so we were pleasantly surprised by this research showing that revolutionaries tend to love spicy food. Challenge yourself to dive into the science, history, and lore of capsaicin, because as Mao said, “he who cannot endure red peppers is also unable to fight.” + Anthony Bourdain …

What We’re Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

If you’re like us, you probably spend a lot of time nerding out on dining news and food industry gossip during the week, but spend your weekends consuming longer and more compelling food narratives. Or maybe you just read the headlines while scrolling through social media because Mondays (all the way through Fridays) just slay. Either way, we’ve got the perfect weekend gift for you: a diverse list of intriguing food stories and news to keep you satiated. Enjoy! + It’s the new year which means healthy eating resolutions are proliferating in the Feastly eater-verse. That’s why we’re intrigued (and challenged) by this story which pointed out that: shoppers think food is healthy only when it costs them more. Healthy food for thought! + We might be dieting, but we’re also eager to get ourselves into the most exclusive restaurant in the country, the Earlton. However, it’s already booked up until 2025. Read about Damon Baehrel’s culinary marvel in The New Yorker. +  If your 2017 bucket list involves eating insects then you are lucky because these budding food startups are …

What We’re Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

If you’re like us, you probably spend a lot of time nerding out on dining news and food industry gossip during the week, but spend your weekends consuming longer and more compelling food narratives. Or maybe you just read the headlines while scrolling through social media because Mondays (all the way through Fridays) just slay. Either way, we’ve got the perfect weekend gift for you: a diverse list of intriguing food stories and news to keep you satiated. Enjoy! + This is the juiciest read behind the bloodiest vegetarian burgers. Sound impossible? Then you should know about the science behind Impossible Foods’ lab-grown “meatless meat,”  a synthesis of juicy hemoglobin balanced with “beef smell.” “When you cook ground beef,” Brown explained, “of the thousands of compounds that come through, maybe 150 have a smell that you can detect. None of them smell like meat. They smell like butter, caramel, dust, garbage, a struck match, lilacs, but not meat. But they become meat” — he tapped his head — “up here.” + In Detroit, a dinner series celebrates Black chefs and farmers changing the city …