Author: Phi Tran

Weekend Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

Rain or shine, the forecast for reading looks positively edifying. This weekend’s list gives us a closer look how science can improve wine bottles, explain why smoothies make you feel fuller, and why acupuncture for cows might not be such a silly idea. + Are you going to restaurants less than before? If you answered yes, you are not alone. According to a recent survey from Reuters/Ipsos, 30 percent U.S. adults “said they were eating out less often than three months ago. Of those diners, 62 percent said cost was the primary reason.” + Laughable, but actually legitimate: Swiss cows are now getting acupuncture. Historically common in Korea and China, the alternative veterinary practice is now bringing positive results for various treatments from inflammation to reduced sperm count. + Uncorking a bottle of wine is a real pleasure but pouring from a wine bottle is a real unpleasant experience thanks to the now 200-year old design. That might soon be a problem of the past thanks to Daniel Perlman, wine-lover, inventor and Brandeis University biophysicist. The solution? Adding an additional groove …

Weekend Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

We hope you’re ready to get lit on the literary. This week’s list is an ode to Lucky Peach, Irene Kuo’s The Key to the Chinese Cooking, Patel Bros, and much more stellar writing from the culinary web. + Travelers and expatriates who have purchased/cooked eggs in foreign countries may already know the answer to this question: why do Americans refrigerate their eggs? Worth a read – this short piece offers a small sampling of the industrial system’s web of influences on American food practices. + This week, we are sad to say goodbye to Lucky Peach. Their days are numbered but there’s no better way to eulogize the irreverent food magazine: by reading these 13 stellar examples of their unique style of lowbrow/highbrow food writing. + Food just tastes better when you’re drunk. Here’s the science to back it up. + Food 52’s historical essay on How America lost the ‘Key to the Chinese Cooking’ is worth a look because it is one of the few biographical narratives of Irene Kuo you’ll find online. Of course we’d also recommend …

What We’re Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

Photo: Catharine Abegg This weekend reading list is a giant serving of inspiration thanks to the amazing talents of women in food everywhere. From 1930’s France to Kabul, Afghanistan – let’s travel the globe for a female perspective. + A story worth toasting: Oakland’s next craft spirit business owner is an East Oakland native and an African American female.  Jessica Moncada is no stranger to breaking barriers: She was one of the first female bartenders to be hired at the Uptown Oakland bar Flora, and over the years she’s gotten her fair share of funny looks when telling strangers that she works in the craft spirits industry — because she doesn’t have “the mustache, or the height, or the look.” + Here’s a name you should know but probably don’t: Eugénie Brazier. She was a trailblazing French chef who held six simultaneous Michelin Stars – a 65-year record that was only bested in 1998 by Alain Ducasse. Brazier was also likely the first chef to receive the first triple star Michelin ranking but history seems to …

Weekend Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

Pull up an armchair and treat yourself to our another round of great food reads. From illustrated food to artsy museum dinners, we think won’t find a tastier list. + Lucky Peach’s list of 30 Iconic Dishes of Fine Dining (complete with black and white illustrations) got us salivating. + The best restaurants are coming to a museum near you, and like the work you might find on the gallery walls, the food is also art. Like that at the National Museum of African American History & Culture in Washington, D.C., Sweet Home Café serves up both art and history on a plate: With the help of noted culinary historian Jessica Harris, Grant and his team have divided African American migration and culinary traditions into four regions. The Agricultural South station serves buttermilk fried chicken and black pepper cornmeal waffles, while the nearby Northern States section offers oyster pan roast, a rendition of a dish made by Thomas Downing, the son of freed slaves who became a restaurateur in New York in the early 1800s.   …

What We’re Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

Gift yourself a serving of good food reads this weekend. From camel milk to aerosol cuisine to Dominique Crenn, we’re sure these will satiate all of your cravings. + Acquire a taste for this: camel milk. This mass market commodity is hitting the grocery aisles in India. NPR has the story behind elixir and its potential health benefits: Elisha Harissa, 45, who has diabetes and lives in a nearby village regularly drinks camel milk. He claims it regulates his blood sugar. A few studies suggest there may be some scientific merit to these claims – camel milk seems to help regulate insulin secretion and blood sugar levels in patients with Type1 diabetes – suggesting it could potentially be used alongside other medical treatments to manage diabetes. However, scientists are still investigating the therapeutic potential of camel milk.  + 2Chainz is known for his fresh rhymes, but according to the Georgia Department of Public Health, his food is not so fresh. The musician’s tapas-style seafood restaurant, Escobar, received an appalling score of 59 out of 100 possible …

Weekend Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

We’ve got the perfect rainy day companion below: a surprising update on Whole Food’s new struggles with organic’s popularity, Shower Beer, West Virginia’s successful school lunches post-Jamie Oliver, and more! + Whole Foods is struggling for the first time in decades and the culprit is exactly who you’re thinking —millennials! According to the Washington Post, millennials’ insatiable appetite for organic food has made organic food product sales more competitive than ever: Walmart ramped up its organics selection in 2006. Kroger introduced its Simple Truth brand in 2012 — the store’s chief executive, Mike Ellis, later said it was the store’s “most successful brand launch ever.” Earlier this week, Aldi announced plans for a $1.6 billion U.S. expansion, with much of that growth aimed at offering “a wider range of organic and gluten-free products.” + Drinking in the shower is not a common past time, but that’s about to change with “Shower Beer” from the Swedish craft brewery PangPang. Why not? It’s the weekend. + Here’s an end to a fishy story: Northern California restaurant Odeum was caught serving …

Weekend Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

What’s threatening food producers this week? Our short list includes immigration policies and global warming. But it’s not all doom and gloom. To keep your reading light, we’re also spicing things up with hot sauces and Harambe in Flamin’ Hot Cheeto form. Read on! + California’s Central Valley farmers who supported Trump are now concerned about losing cheap, immigrant labor. According to researchers at UC Davis, nearly 70% of all farm workers are undocumented, and given the Valley’s agriculture-dominated economy, any threat to low-wage labor would severely impact the region’s 6.5 million people: “If you only have legal labor, certain parts of this industry and this region will not exist,” said Harold McClarty, a fourth-generation farmer in Kingsburg whose operation grows, packs and ships peaches, plums and grapes throughout the country. “If we sent all these people back, it would be a total disaster.” + We’re making a beeline for the hottest new restaurant on the West Coast: SingleThread. Head over to Tasting Table to read about the up-and-coming restaurant and its epic, table-specific 9-course …

What We’re Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

We’ve got the perfect weekend gift for you: a diverse list of intriguing food stories and news to keep you satiated. Enjoy a 9,000-year history of booze and then get curried up with a story about the decline of Britain’s iconic Indian restaurants. + Grab your booze of choice and read 9,000 years of alcohol history. This story from National Geographic paints a vibrant history even monkeys can appreciate: Robert Dudley, the University of California, Berkeley physiologist… calls it the “drunken monkey” hypothesis. The primates that ventured down out of the trees got access to a brand-new food source. “If you can smell the alcohol and get to the fruit faster, you have an advantage,” Dudley says. “You defeat the competition and get more calories.” The ones that stuffed themselves were the most likely to succeed at reproduction—and to experience (while eating) a gentle rush of pleasure in the brain. + Chipotle’s profits fell by 95% in one year, from $476 million in 2015 to just $23 million in 2016. This could spell the beginning of the end of …

Weekend Reading: The Best of Food Writing From Around the Web

Photo by Jeff Kubina We’re serving up another round of diverse food reads this weekend. From tips for making better pizza at home to cannabis pop-ups – there’s something in here to nourish all your reading bones. + If you’ve ever attempted pizza-making at home, you’ll appreciate this great list of advice from Lucky Peach on mastering the savory pie. Our favorite: don’t skimp on time. Instead, age your dough in the fridge for more complex flavor and texture! + The popularity of the Instant Pot caught us by surprise, and apparently its rise to fame was due to good, old-fashioned word of mouth – but on social media. Read more on NPR’s coverage of the multi-function pressure cooker and its manufacturer’s savvy marketing tactics: While the company does not sponsor paid content or promotions, it has provided free Instant Pots to 200 bloggers and cookbook authors who represent many styles of cooking, including Chinese, Italian, sous-vide and vegan. + Post-inauguration, things are getting a lot more political in the kitchen. As more and more restaurants …